Simone Fernando
 Sacconi


The Man and the Maestro

as Seen by the Greatest Violinmakers, Experts,
and Musicians Who Knew Him

From the book:
«From Violinmaking to Music:
The Life and Works of Simone Fernando Sacconi»
Cremona: Aclap, 1985

In the image above:
The Maestro Sacconi in his workshop at Point Lookout, Long Island, 1948

Simone Fernando Sacconi

The Maestro Sacconi intent on roughing the outline of the back of an instrument.

«Sacconi was an important figure, because he managed to stimulate the development of contemporary violinmaking, to which he contributed with most beautiful examples. He was also able to transmit his love for the greats of the past, and was successful in teaching so many young violinists that Guarnerius, Stradivarius, Bergonzi, Amati, and all the others should be admired and loved, not only as great violinmakers, but also as examples of human genius, as the products of a great civilization. (...)
For Sacconi, violinmaking was simply a form of life.»
[Henryk Szeryng. Monaco, June 24, 1985]

Simone Fernando Sacconi

Copy of the inlaid violin by Antonio Stradivari «Hellier» of 1679, made by the Maestro in 1941. The instrument, owned by the Municipality of Cremona, is kept in the prestigious Violin Museum of Cremona, visited every year by thousands of people from all over the world. © Photo Getty Images
In the photo below:
Cremona, Museo del Violino.

Simone Fernando Sacconi

«I 'segreti' di Stradivari». Libreria del Convegno Editrice. Cremona, 1972.

«I 'segreti' di Stradivari» was Fernando Sacconi's final gift to his profession, a detailed account of how Stradivari made his unique instruments, and it has become almost a bible. The method described in it is, I believe, certainly Stradivari's and almost certainly the best, but Sacconi would have been upset at those who follow it blindly and assume that their result will inevitably be good. He achieved what he did and became the great person that he was by questioning everything, following his own instincts and making up his own mind, and always looking for a better way of doing things, and a better result. Antonio Stradivari himself can hardly have been very different.» 
[Charles Beare. London, July 4, 1985]


2023
In memory of Simone Fernando Sacconi
in the 50th anniversary of his death



2023 marks the 50th Anniversary of the death of the violin-maker, restorer and expert Simone Fernando Sacconi (Point Lookout, Long Island, June 26, 1973), one of the most influential exponents of 20th century violin-making.

In view of this important event and to honour the Maestro's memory, it seemed appropriate to propose on this website dedicated to him some extracts of the book «From Violinmaking to Music: The Life and Works of Simone Fernando Sacconi», printed by Aclap in 1985 and presented on 17 December of the same year at the Library of Congress in Washington D.C.

With this international publication, conceived and promoted by masters violin-makers Francesco Bissolotti and Wanna Zambelli of Cremona, we wanted to collect documents and testimonies of many who in the world – great violin-makers, restorers and experts, famous musicians, collectors and scholars – have known or worked with the Maestro Sacconi. The importance and historical value of the individual testimonies have led to strictly respect the integrity of the original texts, in their multiplicity and variety of styles, intonations and forms of expression.

In this way, the spontaneity and the richness of everyone’s feeling have been safeguarded, qualities that have made this work, first of all, a precious homage of the greats of yesterday and today to the great Maestro and his art.

*********

(...) It was this extraordinary affection for instruments, this compassion for the performers whom he befriended, that made Fernando Sacconi a unique individual and regarded by every professional the world over as the number one man to whom one could go for final judgment. He created the standard by which all others were judged, and there are great numbers of luthiers and violinists who owe their careers and their understanding to his generosity. And thus his memory continues within all of us.
[Isaac Stern. New York, February 19, 1984]

There is no doubt that Simone Fernando Sacconi was a very great instrument maker, and any restoration performed by him was in itself a masterpiece. His sensitivity and admiration for the magnificent instruments which passed through his hands was marked by such reverence. How he studied and measured the great Strads, Amatis, and Guarneris! It became a «love affair». 
(...) The string players of today owe Simone F. Sacconi an enormous debt of gratitude. 
[Leonard Rose. New York, January 19, 1984]

(...) Fernando Sacconi's inquisitive mind explored everything to do with violins and bows, and he became renowned both as a maker of new instruments, and as a connoisseur, restorer and adjuster of the finest old ones. Many of his closest friends and most valued customers have also passed away, but from the accounts of the musicians who have kindly contributed to this book comes a picture of a liutaio devoted to them and uniquely qualified to serve their needs.

From the violin makers the reader will sense not only the unique respect in which Maestro Sacconi was held, but also something of his greatness as a teacher, and of his warmhearted generosity with the knowledge that he had so painstakingly acquired.
[Charles Beare. London, July 4, 1985]

I first met Sacconi in 1937 in Cremona and later that same year in New York, where he directed the workshop of Emil Herrmann. At that time I showed him an unvarnished violin for his critique and advice and from then on visited him regularly until I was employed by Emil Herrmann. From that point on, working full time with Sacconi, I had the unusual opportunity to work under his guidance until 1947, when I moved to Los Angeles and established my own business. I will not dwell on anecdotes, but will state what I believe are the most important and admirable contributions which this renaissance man made to our art and craft.

First of all he had a marvelous skill in all phases of wood carving, classing him among the best ever. In addition he could draw and retouch like a painter and above all, he understood the great classic Italian makers of the 16th, 17th and 18th centuries and had developed – through his almost fanatical dedication and industry – a great overall knowledge and refined taste.
With all these wonderfully developed gifts came an artistic fantasy which enabled him to invent new and sophisticated repair techniques which he taught to those students who really worked with him. He was a true pioneer in this field and the consequence of his teaching activity was that he raised the level of violin making and repairing in the United States to such a degree that it is second to none today. His associates have carried on his work here as well as in Europe.
As far as research is concerned, nobody before Sacconi matched the zeal with which he studied the work of the classic Italian makers. The very intimate study of about two-thirds of Stradivari's work enabled him to publish his very valuable work «I ‘Segreti’ di Stradivari». He also became very interested in the study of materials used by the classic makers and his findings in regard to the purfling materials used by different makers and in different schools were faithfully catalogued and added to by Dario D'Attili, who was undoubtedly the most devoted pupil, assistant and longest co-worker (35 years) of Sacconi.
I have been asked in what way Sacconi influenced my work. The answer is “in every way”. He helped me to understand and appreciate the great classic Italian tradition.
[Hans Weisshaar. Los Angeles, March 21, 1984]

Sacconi was an oracle for us violinists. Whenever we got together and asked each other about a violin – what it was, or wasn't – the first question was, “Has Sacconi seen it? What did he say about it?” He always had the last word – it was the gospel, and not just for us, but for all his colleagues, as well, This is even more important, because he had some extraordinary colleagues, but all of them agreed that Sacconi had the last word – especially when it had to do with Stradivarius. Thus he was held in immense respect – really enormous; both among my colleagues and among his, he was a sort of myth. Sacconi was a myth, and that's how I want to remember him... as a great guiding light, an essential point of reference for musicians and violinmakers, alike – a great, great expert, and a really superior man of extraordinary humanity.

[Salvatore Accardo. Cremona, October 7, 1983]


Fernando Sacconi was an artisan who through incessant labor brought his art to that high degree of perfection that only true passion for the profession enables one to obtain. Faithful, modest in spite of his reputation and erudition, and with Latin sensitivity, one could say of him along with
[William, e.n.] Shakespeare: 

«The elements were so mixed in him, that nature might stand up and say to all of the world, 'This was a man!'» 
[Pierre Vidoudez. Geneva, July 1, 1983]

Sacconi was an important figure, because he managed to stimulate the development of contemporary violinmaking, to which he contributed with most beautiful examples. He was also able to transmit his love for the greats of the past, and was successful in teaching so many young violinists that Guarnerius, Stradivarius, Bergonzi, Amati, and all the others should be admired and loved, not only as great violinmakers, but also as examples of human genius, as the products of a great civilization. We know that one must be an artist in order to be a violinmaker, and it is necessary to be a man of science, of wisdom, and of philosophy, as well. We are aware of the fact that violins cannot be constructed solely with the application of the laws of physical acoustics, that the empirical aspect has its importance; rules exist and must be respected, naturally, but the exceptions and variables are so numerous. In this sense, and on this subject, Fernando Sacconi succeded in what I would define an apostolic mission: he developed a sense for tone quality and for its capacity to reach the greatest distances; he encouraged everyone to search for big, rich sonority, but he was always against forcing, which naturally causes the violin to emit sounds that are lacking in clarity. We were very much in agreement on this point, because both he and I believe that the volume of sound increases with the beauty of the tone quality, and not just with force, with pressure on the bow.
I believe that the contribution Simone Fernando Sacconi made to the philosophy of the violin was most important, and in innumerable cases he demonstrated that it is possible to have respect for tradition, and at the same time have the ambition to search for new ways, new possibilities.
In order to do things of importance, man in general, the artist, the man of science, the poet, the painter, the sculptor, need to concentrate, to be able to isolate themselves during the preparation of a compelling piece of work. Sacconi went to Long Island near New York City, very close to the ocean and to the beautiful Jones Beach, and when be felt the need for inspiration, instead of staying in his atelier be went for a walk. For me, even taking a walk by oneself bas a most important function in the life of the artist, because if one walks in the vicinity of a masterpiece or in the midst of natural beauty, the moment of inspiration suddenly arrives, even though one may not be conscious of the miracle. In this, too, I find part of the affinity that bound me to Sacconi: the search for beauty, for Nature, for concentrated thought.
Simone Fernando Sacconi's most fundamental contribution to the fields of music and violinmaking was that of having served as a sort of bridge between Cremona and all the modem violinmakers. He did not say that the Cremonese masters should be copied – that would not even be possible – but he firmly believed that one must profit from the wonderful experience of the past, search for the possibilities of the future, and in the present, mix elements of both.
For Sacconi, violinmaking was simply a form of life.
[Henryk Szeryng. Monaco, June 24, 1985]

I would do Sacconi an injustice if I didn't mention the great esteem and highest consideration that everyone in musical circles had for him. They all knew him, from Menuhin to Stern, to Francescatti, to Brengola, Gulli, Accardo, Zukerman, Perlman, etc., and everyone considered him a great luminary, the superlative professional, both in restoration and in fitting up antique instruments.
His ability to repair the great masterpieces of the past was proverbial. He brought them back to life with an extraordinary manual dexterity, which was the fruit both of his enormous experience and of his exceptional sensitivity and great love for the creativity of his work.
To reintroduce the figure of Sacconi today means above all, I think, a re-proposal of the central value of creativity in work in the context of our modern industrial society, a value which I believe the work of the violinmaker and the art of the violinist should have in common. 
[Uto Ughi. Venice, February 17, 1985]

I met Simone Fernando Sacconi about twenty years ago during my first concert tour in America, when the Maestro was still at the Wurlitzer shop on 42nd Street.
I was immediately fascinated by the extraordinary personality, human and professional, of Simone Sacconi, by his incredible knowledge of antique violinmaking, and by his sublime skill in creation and restoration.  
[Franco Gulli. Bloomington, Indiana, July 5, 1983]

I have a photograph of Sacconi in my shop, hanging behind me while I work. I call him my guardian angel; I know it may seem silly, but I have conversations of sorts with him, especially when I'm in difficulty and I tell him what my problem is. Somehow I feel that, with him there, I can solve the problem better: it's like having a shoulder to lean on. If anything goes wrong, I turn around and blame him, then I think about what he would have done in a similar situation. I still try to follow his ideals, to be mentally elastic and to take care of every detail of the restorations I am doing in the way he would have adopted. We had, and still have, a kind of spiritual relationship. Sometimes I feel like I'm doing things more his way than mine! I think that's what keeps making me successful in my work.
[Carlos Arcieri. New York, February 28, 1984]

I am sure at this time, if there is a violin maker's heaven, he 
sits at Antonio Stradivarius's right hand asking Joseph Guarneri del Gesù, "Why were you such a careless workman?" 
[Anthony Wrona. Buffalo, May 1, 1984]


The 'secret' greatness of 
Simone Fernando Sacconi

by Claudio Rampini


Simone Fernando Sacconi is impossible to define in a few words because the figure of this great violin-maker cannot be enclosed in a rigid category, given the vastness of his work and his thought, but I will still try to trace the essential lines to give an idea of who Sacconi was and his importance in the history of violin-making and music in general.

First, it is important to point out that among others, Sacconi had Giuseppe Fiorini as a teacher who introduced him to the "secrets" of Stradivari's work; in fact, it was Fiorini himself who managed after many difficulties, managed to acquire the entire collection of the original tools and forms from Stradivari's workshop. Therefore, Sacconi had the privilege of having first-hand information on the work of the great Stradivari, and not working on the basis of "hearsay," which unfortunately has characterised much of the history of Italian violin-making from the end of 1700 onwards.

It should be remembered that, that while rivers of ink have been spilled on the subject of classical Cremonese violin-making, we have had to take note that that golden age of our art saw its glory come to an end in the mid-1700s, due to changing political and social conditions. Basically, there were no heirs or scholars who could pass on the way of working of the ancient violin-makers of Cremona.

This irremediable fracture between the ancient and the modern worlds of violin-making has resulted in instruments that differ in construction method and thus, also in sound from the classical ones, which also contributed to the myth of Stradivari and his alleged "secrets".

Sacconi, who emigrated to the United States in 1931, first found employment at Hermann and then at Wurlitzer, two of the largest traders in ancient instruments then present on the world violin and musical scene, and it was here that Sacconi developed his masterly art of restoring original instruments.

Soon, Sacconi became the reference point for most of the most famous musicians in the world, because it is not enough to own a beautiful violin by Stradivari or Guarneri del Gesù to be guaranteed memorable concerts, a good instrument needs to be attended to constantly, a bit like a racing car and its mechanic, was there at all times to ensure that the instruments were always in the optimum condition to express their wonderful tone.

The lesson that Sacconi still teaches us today is that of continuity: in tradition, in building new instruments, in repairing and developing historical ones, in assisting musicians, in developing the culture and taste for music, in allowing the young generations of violin-makers and musicians to start off on the right foot, in keeping the spirit of research alive.

Without a guarantee of continuity to the violin-maker, there would be nothing left but mute pieces of meaningless wood on which to work.

At the end of the 1950s, Sacconi began his "pilgrimages" to Cremona, bringing with him his endless and precious wealth of knowledge, because Stradivari and the environment in which he had lived wanted to get to know him well, in the certainty that a purely abandoned art such as that of classical violin-making still leaves some trace behind it. And he was surprised to see that the original tools of Stradivari's workshop, donated to the city of Cremona by his master Giuseppe Fiorini, lying abandoned and gathering dust in a museum.

But the people of Cremona are not to blame, because the history of art is characterised by abandonment and rediscovery; just as the music of Bach and Vivaldi was rediscovered centuries after the disappearance of their composers, the original tools and forms of Stradivari's instruments also needed someone to rediscover them and understand their importance.

Sacconi was granted honourary citizenship by the Municipality of Cremona for his extraordinary violin-making and cultural merits; the Roman Sacconi, an adopted American and honoured citizen of Cremona, in fact can be considered a cosmopolitan, a man who has travelled from one culture to another without ever being affected by them and who was always able to capture their best side.

Together with his beloved students, Francesco Bissolotti and Wanna Zambelli, Sacconi lived in Cremona for one of the most creative periods of his life, and it is no coincidence that thanks to him, the legendary violin by Antonio Stradivari, now known as the "Cremonese 1715", was the first classical instrument to return to the city after more than 200 years of absence. A city that regains its memory.

Sacconi's spiritual testament is his book "I 'segreti' di Stradivari (The 'Secrets' of Stradivari)", a work in which he transferred the immense wealth of his knowledge, still considered a reference text today for anyone interested in instruments, music and violin-making, which provides infinite research ideas and in fact marked the boundary between violin-making based on "hearsay" and that of having seen and touched.

The 50th anniversary of Sacconi's death, which will fall next year in 2023, is not only an opportunity to remember this great violin-maker, but also to talk about and discuss his book, his teachings and his methods. Not only that, we will also have the opportunity to listen to some of Sacconi's wonderful instruments through the great mastery of the English «Sacconi Quartet» ensemble which, on 25 June 2023, will be the main act of a highly anticipated concert in the splendid «Giovanni Arvedi» Auditorium of the Violin Museum of Cremona. Sacconi himself will return to speak to us through his instruments, offering us a unique opportunity for artistic growth.


In the photo above: Tenor Viola by Simone Fernando Sacconi, New York 1934

Text and photo by © Claudio Rampini, 21 July 2022


Simone Fernando
Sacconi

Cello built by the Maestro
(Roma, 1927)

«Sacconi Quartet»
in concert


Sacconi Quartet


Simone Fernando Sacconi
The name Sacconi Quartet comes from the outstanding twentieth-century Italian luthier and restorer Simone Fernando Sacconi, whose book The "Secrets" of Stradivari is considered an indispensable reference for violin makers.

Sacconi Quartet's instruments
Ben Hancox plays a 1932 Sacconi violin and Robin Ashwell a 1934 Sacconi viola, both made in New York. Hannah Dawson plays a 1927 Sacconi violin made in Rome, and Cara Berridge plays a Nicolaus Gagliano cello from 1781. Ben, Hannah & Cara have all been generously loaned these instruments by the Royal Society of Musicians, Britain’s oldest music charity helping musicians in need, for which they are extremely grateful. Robin is indebted to Ellen Solomon for the use of his viola.

Testimonies
on the Maestro Sacconi

Simone Fernando Sacconi
in his wife’s story
Teresita Pacini

Point Lookout, Long Island, February 29, 1984


From the book:
«From Violinmaking to Music:
The Life and Works of Simone Fernando Sacconi»


In the image:

Simone Fernando Sacconi

Charles Beare
Violinmaker, restorer and expert

London, July 4, 1985

Charles Beare 
and the Maestro Sacconi


Introduction to the book:
«From Violinmaking to Music:
The Life and Works of Simone Fernando Sacconi»


In the image:
The cover of the book
(English version)

Link: Charles Beare

Francesco Bissolotti
Violinmaker

Cremona, June 26, 1985

Francesco Bissolotti
and the Maestro Sacconi


From the book:
«From Violinmaking to Music: 
The Life and Works of Simone Fernando Sacconi»


In the image:
The cover of the book
(Italian version)

Link: Francesco Bissolotti

Lee Wurlitzer
Former President, Rembert Wurlitzer, Inc.

New York, April 29, 1985

Lee Wurlitzer
and the Maestro Sacconi


From the book: «From Violinmaking to Music: The Life and Works of Simone Fernando Sacconi»


In the images (from above):

 On the right, Maestro Sacconi with Mrs Lee Wurlitzer (center) and daughter Marianne (second from left).
Mrs Wurlitzer became President of the Rembert Wurlitzer firm of luthiers and traders in ancient instruments after the death of her husband Rembert, who had founded the company in New York in 1949. The collaboration between Rembert Wurlitzer and Fernando Sacconi had brought the company to world fame and had made it the meeting point of the most famous musicians in the field of string instruments. As President, Mrs Wurlitzer has distinguished herself by concluding the greatest transaction ever made, that of the precious violins of the Hottinger Collection.

√ Rembert Wurlitzer, Founder and President of the prestigious New York Violin House, in which Sacconi worked for over twenty years. After the Maestro’s death, the company ceased its activity.

√ At R. Wurlitzer, Inc. to 120 West 42nd Street in New York.
In the foreground (from left): Simone Fernando Sacconi, Rembert Wurlitzer and Dario D'Attili.
In the background (from left)René A. Morel, Mario D'Alessandro, John Roskoski, Tommy Bertucca, William Salchow, Hans J. Nebel and Frank Passa.

Link: Rembert Wurlitzer Co.

Marianne Wurlitzer
Former Vice-President, Rembert Wurlitzer, Inc.

New York, July 11, 1985

Marianne Wurlitzer
and the Maestro Sacconi


From the book:
«From Violinmaking to Music: 
The Life and Works 
of Simone Fernando Sacconi»


In the image:
The Maestro Sacconi with Marianne Wurlitzer, daughter of Rembert and Lee Wurlitzer.

Link: Rembert Wurlitzer Co.

Violin by
Antonio Stradivari
«Il Cremonese» 1715
ex Joachim



The Maestro Sacconi adored the great violin maker. He dedicated a lifetime of studies and research to Stradivari, whose results he documented in detail in the book «I 'Segreti' di Stradivari».

«I 'Segreti' di Stradivari» was Fernando Sacconi's final gift to his profession, a detailed account of how Stradivari made his unique instruments, and it has become almost a bible. The method described in it is, I believe, certainly Stradivari's and almost certainly the best, but Sacconi would have been upset at those who follow it blindly and assume that their result will inevitably be good. He achieved what he did and became the great person that he was by questioning everything, following his own instincts and making up his own mind, and always looking for a better way of doing things, and a better result. Antonio Stradivari himself can hardly have been very different.

[Charles Beare. London, July 4, 1985]

The famous instrument is kept in the prestigious «Museo del Violino» of Cremona, in Italy, visited by thousands of people every year, and is played in concerts and performances of international violinists in the Auditorium «Giovanni Arvedi» of the same Museum, concert hall of superb beauty and whose perfect acoustics is praised all over the world.

Link: Museo del Violino

The Maestro Sacconi
in the testimonies of some of the greatest Musicians
who knew him
(in alphabetical order)

Salvatore Accardo
Violinist

Cremona, October 7, 1983

Salvatore Accardo
and the Maestro Sacconi


From the book:

«From Violinmaking to Music:
The Life and Works 
of Simone Fernando Sacconi»


In the image:
The violinist Salvatore Accardo
biografieonline.it

Link: Salvatore Accardo

Amedeo Baldovino
Cellist

Florence, June 21, 1985

Amedeo Baldovino
and the Maestro Sacconi


From the book: «From Violinmaking to Music: The Life and Works of Simone Fernando Sacconi»

From left in the image: The violinist Renato Zanettovich,
the pianist Dario De Rosa and the cellist 
Amedeo Baldovino.
Link: Trio di Trieste

Pina Carmirelli
Violinist

Rome, June 11, 1985

Pina Carmirelli
and the Maestro Sacconi


From the book:

«From Violinmaking to Music: The Life and
Works
of Simone Fernando Sacconi»

In the image
:
The violinist Pina Carmirelli


Link: Pina Carmirelli

Pablo Casals
Cellist

Molitg-les-Bains (Pyr. Or.), France, June 7, 1958

Pablo Casals
and the Maestro Sacconi


From the book:

«From Violinmaking to Music:
The Life 
and Works
of Simone Fernando Sacconi»


In the image:
The cellist Pablo Casals
Image: Photo Researchers by Getty Images

Link: Pablo Casals

Rocco Filippini
Cellist

Lugano, October 23, 1983

Rocco Filippini
and the Maestro Sacconi


From the book:

«From Violinmaking to Music: The Life and
Works
of Simone Fernando Sacconi»


In the image:
The cellist Rocco Filippini
©Cosimo Filippini 2009

Pierre Fournier
Cellist

Thessaloniki, Greece, January 21, 1984

Pierre Fournier
and the Maestro Sacconi


From the book:

«From Violinmaking to Music:
The Life 
and Works
of Simone Fernando Sacconi»

In the image:
The cellist Pierre Fournier

Getty Images
Link: Pierre Fournier

Zino Francescatti
Violinist

La Ciotat, June 20, 1985

Zino Francescatti
and the Maestro Sacconi


From the book:
«From Violinmaking to Music: The Life and
Works
of Simone Fernando Sacconi»

From left in the image:
The Maestro Sacconi

and the violinist Zino Francescatti

Link: Zino Francescatti

Joseph Fuchs
Violinist

New York, March 4, 1984

Joseph Fuchs
and the Maestro Sacconi


From the book:

«From Violinmaking to Music: 
The Life and Works 
of Simone Fernando Sacconi»


In the imageViolin by Antonio Stradivari
«The Penny». Cremona, around the year 1770.
Christie's Images / Artothek / Archivi Alinari.

Carlo Maria Giulini
Violist and Conductor

Milan, June 19, 1985

Carlo Maria Giulini
and the Maestro Sacconi


From the book:

«From Violinmaking to Music:
The Life and Works
of Simone Fernando Sacconi»


In the image:
Carlo Maria Giulini and the World Philarmonic Orchestra

(Photo by Jacques Langevin / Sygma via Getty Images)

Franco Gulli
Violinist

Bloomington, Indiana, July 5, 1983

Franco Gulli
and the Maestro Sacconi


From the book:

«From Violinmaking to Music:
The Life and Works
of Simone Fernando Sacconi»


In the image:
The violinist Franco Gulli
pixnet.net

Link: Franco Gulli 

Yehudi Menuhin
Violinist

London, January 19, 1984

Yehudi Menuhin
and the Maestro Sacconi


From the book:
«From Violinmaking to Music:
The Life and Works
of Simone Fernando Sacconi»

In the image:
The violinist Yehudi Menuhin
Getty Images
Link: Yehudi Menuhin

Ruggiero Ricci
Violinist

Harrogate, Great Britain, August 7, 1985

Ruggiero Ricci
and the Maestro Sacconi


From the book:

«From Violinmaking to Music:
The Life and Works
of Simone Fernando Sacconi»

In the image:
The violinist Ruggiero Ricci
plays April 25, 1977 in New York.

(Photo by Santi Visalli/Getty Images).

Link: Ruggiero Ricci

Leonard Rose
Cellist

New York, January 19, 1984

Leonard Rose
and the Maestro Sacconi


From the book:

«From Violinmaking to Music:
The Life and Works
of Simone Fernando Sacconi»

In the image:
The cellist Leonard Rose.
Photo by Erich Auerbach / Getty Images.

Link: Leonard Rose

Alexander Schneider
Violinist

New York, January 26, 1984

Alexander Schneider
and the Maestro Sacconi


From the book:

«From Violinmaking to Music:
The Life and Works
of Simone Fernando Sacconi»

In the images (from above):

 The violinist Alexander Schneider, signed by autograph.
From letravivalivros.com.br

From the left in the photo:
The violinist Alexander Schneider, the cellist Pablo Casals and
the Maestro Sacconi.


Link:
 Alexander Schneider

Isaac Stern
Violinist

New York, February 19, 1984

Isaac Stern
and the Maestro Sacconi


From the book:

«From Violinmaking to Music: 
The Life and Works
of Simone Fernando Sacconi»

In the image:
The violinist Isaac Stern.
Getty Images Frank Micelotta Archive

Henryk Szeryng
Violinist

Principato di Monaco, June 24, 1985

Henryk Szeryng
and the Maestro Sacconi


From the book:
«From Violinmaking to Music:
The Life and Works
of Simone Fernando Sacconi»

In the image:
The violinist 
Henryk Szeryng

Uto Ughi
Violinist

Venice, February 17, 1985

Uto Ughi
and the Maestro Sacconi


From the book:

«From Violinmaking to Music:
The Life and Works
of Simone Fernando Sacconi»

In the image:
The violinist Uto Ughi


Renato Zanettovich
Violinist

Trieste, June 7, 1985

Renato Zanettovich
and the Maestro Sacconi


From the book:

«From Violinmaking to Music:
The Life and Works
of Simone Fernando Sacconi»

In the image:
The violinist Renato Zanettovich
Image: Marco Zanettovich

Link: Renato Zanettovich

Simone Fernando Sacconi
fishing with some colleagues on the Atlantic Ocean in Long Island Bay


In the photo, from the left:

Dario D'Attili, Fernando Sacconi, Vahakn Nigogosian, Charles Beare, Hans J. Nebel e René A. Morel.
In the center, in the foreground: Mario D'Alessandro.

Long Island
Long Island, in the state of New York, is an island on the east coast of the United States, located opposite the states of New York and Connecticut. It is 190 km long and has a maximum width of 37 km. It is separated from the mainland by the Long Island Sound, a 145 km long and 5 to 32 km wide stretch of sea. Istock image.


The Maestro Sacconi in the testimonies of some of his most
prestigious students and colleagues

(in alphabetical order, on PC and tablet)

carlos arcieri

New York, February 28, 1984

CHARLES BEARE

London, July 4, 1985

LUIZ BELLINI

New York, March 2, 1984

DARIO D'ATTILI

Dumont, New Jersey, March 6, 1984

BERNARD MILLANT

Paris, August 29, 1983

RENÉ A. MOREL

New York, August 31, 1983

VAHAKN NIGOGOSIAN

New York, March 1, 1984

JOHN A. ROSKOSKI

New York, July 9, 1985

PIERRE VIDOUDEZ

Geneva, July 1, 1985

HANS WEISSHAAR

Los Angeles, March 21, 1984

MARIO D'ALESSANDRO

Nutley, New Jersey, July 18, 1985

JACQUES FRANÇAIS

New York, March 29, 1984

MAX MÖLLER

Huizen, July  10, 1983

HANS J. NEBEL

Harrington Park, September 19, 1983

FRANK PASSA

San Francisco, March 10, 1984

WILLIAM SALCHOW

New York, June 10, 1985

WILLIAM H. WEBSTER

Old Tappan, New Jersey, June 16, 1985

ANTHONY WRONA

Buffalo, May 1, 1984

David Segal
Violinmaker and restorer

New York, March 3, 1984

David Segal
and the Maestro Sacconi


From the book:

«From Violinmaking to Music:
The Life and Works
of Simone Fernando Sacconi»

From the left in the image:
The Maestro Sacconi,
David Segal and Francesco Bissolotti

Andrea Mosconi
Curator of the patrimony of stringed instruments of the City of Cremona

Cremona, July 28, 1985

Andrea Mosconi
and the Maestro Sacconi


From the book:

«From Violinmaking to Music:
The Life and Works
of Simone Fernando Sacconi»

From the left in the image:
The Maestro Sacconi and the professor Andrea Mosconi

Link: Mosconi Andrea

Wanna Zambelli
Violin maker and teacher at the Cremona International Violin Making School

Cremona, June 29, 1985

Wanna Zambelli
and the Maestro Sacconi


From the book:

«From Violinmaking to Music:
The Life and Works
of Simone Fernando Sacconi»

In the image:
The violin maker Wanna Zambelli
Cremona, 1983

Link: Wanna Zambelli

List of testimonies
on the Maestro Sacconi


Collected in the book:

«From Violinmaking to Music:
The Life and Works
of Simone Fernando Sacconi»

Sections:
Introduction
Violinmakers, restorers and experts / Musicians / Collectors, scholars and amateurs / Imprint and Acknowledgements

The images are taken from the book «From Violinmaking to Music:  The Life and Works of Simone Fernando Sacconi»,
unless otherwise indicated